THELAW.TV

5 Things To Know Today



Hostess Continues Plans To Liquidate

The maker of Twinkies and Ding Dongs said late Tuesday that it failed to reach an agreement with its second biggest union. As a result, Hostess plans to continue with a hearing on Wednesday in which a bankruptcy court judge will decide if the company can shutter its operations. The renewed talks between Hostess and The Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union came after the company declared last week that it would move to wind down its business and start selling off its assets in bankruptcy court. The company cited a crippling strike that was started on Nov. 9 by the union, which represents 30 percent of Hostess workers.

Microsoft VS. Google Trial Over Patents Finishes Up

A Google expert witness testified on Tuesday that Microsoft will make roughly $94 billion in revenue through 2017 from its Xbox game console and Surface tablet that use Google’s patented wireless technology. Michael Dansky, an expert for Google’s Motorola Mobility unit, testified on the last day of a high stakes trial over patents between Microsoft and Google in Seattle. The $94 billion figure he cited also includes a wireless adapter that Microsoft no longer sells. It was not clear how far back he was counting past revenues. Microsoft declined comment on the figure. The week-long trial in a Seattle federal court examined how much of a royalty Microsoft Corp should pay Google Inc for a license to some of Motorola’s patents. Google bought Motorola earlier this year for $12.5 billion, partly for its library of communications patents. Motorola had sought up to $4 billion a year for its wireless and video patents, while Microsoft argues its rival deserves just over $1 million a year.

Jury Convicts NY Man Accused Of AT&T, iPad Hacking

A federal jury convicted a New York man on Tuesday of hacking into AT&T Inc servers and stealing the email addresses and other personal data of about 120,000 Apple Inc iPad users, a U.S. attorney in New Jersey said. Andrew Auernheimer, 27, was convicted by a Newark, New Jersey, jury of one count of conspiracy to access the servers without permission, as well as one count of identity theft, said U.S. Attorney Paul Fishman. The defendant faces a maximum five years in prison and $250,000 fine on each count. A co-defendant, Daniel Spitler, pleaded guilty to the same charges in June 2011 and is awaiting sentencing. Prosecutors said Auernheimer and Spitler were affiliated with Goatse Security, a group of Internet “trolls” that tries to disrupt online content and services. According to the government, the men used an “account slurper” that was designed to match email addresses with “integrated circuit card identifiers” for iPad users, and which conducted a “brute force” attack to extract data about those users, who accessed the Internet through AT&T’s network.

San Francisco Votes To Ban Public Nudity 

San Francisco lawmakers disappointed committed nudists Tuesday by narrowly approving a ban on public nakedness despite concerns the measure would undermine the city’s reputation as a sanctuary for free expression. The Board of Supervisors voted 6-5 in favor of a public safety ordinance that prohibits exposed genitals in most public places, including streets, sidewalks and public transit. The law still must pass a final vote and secure Mayor Edwin Lee’s signature to take effect early next year. Supervisor Scott Wiener introduced the ban in response to escalating complaints about a group of men whose bare bodies are on display almost daily in the city’s predominantly gay Castro District.

Elmo Actor Kevin Clash Resigns Amid Sex Allegations

Sesame Workshop says Elmo puppeteer Kevin Clash has resigned from “Sesame Street” in the wake of allegations that he had sex with an under-aged youth. Last week a man accused Clash of having sex with him when he was a teenage boy, a charge Clash denied. A day later, the man recanted his charge. A lawsuit by a second accuser was filed Tuesday, according to attorney Cecil Singleton. Sesame Workshop called the controversy surrounding Clash’s personal life “a distraction that none of us want” and led to his decision to leave the show. Clash created the voice and persona for Elmo, who has become one of “Sesame Street’s” most popular characters.

 

 

Tagged with:

Related Articles