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Lance Armstrong Apologizes To Cycling Community Ahead of Oprah Interview



 The U.S. Justice Department is considering joining a whistleblower suit, filed by former Armstrong teammate Floyd Landis, whose own doping led to his being stripped of his 2006 Tour de France title, alleging that Armstrong defrauded the federal government of tens of millions of dollars by violating his contract to compete “clean” for the U.S. Postal Service cycling team.

On the eve of Monday’s taped interview with Oprah Winfrey, Lance Armstrong made a series of phone calls to apologize directly to key people in the cycling community with whom he had not been truthful about his part in sports doping.

It was part of Armstrong’s effort to prepare himself and others for what’s anticipated to be a partial confession and to make amends with those to whom he lied and misled.

The Washington Post reports Armstrong’s conversation with Winfrey will mark the first public comments he has made about the widespread allegations in a 1,000-page document released last fall by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

That document, based in part on the testimony of 11 of Armstrong’s former teammates, led to his being stripped of his record seven Tour de France titles and being barred from competition in October by cycling’s international governing body. It concluded that Armstrong’s cycling heroics were the result of “the most sophisticated, professional and successful doping program that sport has ever seen.”

The U.S. Justice Department is considering joining a whistleblower suit, filed by former Armstrong teammate Floyd Landis, whose own doping led to his being stripped of his 2006 Tour de France title, alleging that Armstrong defrauded the federal government of tens of millions of dollars by violating his contract to compete “clean” for the U.S. Postal Service cycling team.

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